ELD Full Enforcement has Begun: 5 things you Need to Know

1.  April 1st marks the end of the ELD "grace period."

From December 18, 2017 to the April 1st, 2018,  we were in the soft enforcement phase of the ELD mandate's initiation.  Now, there will be ubiquitous censuring of drivers and companies who aren't compliant with the new laws.  (Source A, cited below)

 

2.  You can be dubbed "Out of Service" for not complying with hours.

"That OOS order will be in effect for 10 hours for truck drivers. At the end of the OOS period, the driver will be allowed to continue to his or her next scheduled stop using paper logs. But the driver should not be dispatched again without an ELD. If he or she heads out again without an ELD, the driver may be placed OOS yet again and the motor carrier will be subject to further enforcement action." (Source B, cited below)

 

3.  8 consecutive hours need to be spent in the sleeper berth + 2 separate consecutive hours off duty.

The "sleep berther rule" forces drivers to spend 8 hours in a row in their cabin.  Another 2 consecutive hours must be spent off duty as well, whether that's in their cabin or not.  A total of 10 hours MUST be spent off duty. (Source B, cited below)

 

4.  Time spent loading, unloading, and waiting DOES count toward the 14 hour day.

That's right!  If you're stuck in detention for 5 hours, that means you'll be driving considerably less that day.  Hopefully, this might incentivize warehouses to become more efficient -- ha!  We can always dream.  

 

 

     Keep in mind that these next few months are uncharted territory.  While the sky is not falling, we still don't know what full enforcement of the ELD mandate will truly mean for our industry.  All we can do is be compliant, and start planning accordingly. 

     Remember that drivers are only allowed to be working for 14 hours a day.  Drive time + time spent at the cons or shipper, has to be equal to or less than that.  Luckily, since we've all been preparing for this to happen, we shouldn't be thrown for too much of a loop.  Here's hoping we have a smooth transition!

 

Sources:

Article A

Article B